Migraine diagnosis & treatment

Migraine diagnosis & treatment

Your medical professional will ask about your health history and your symptoms. It may help if you have a diary of your symptoms and any triggers you’ve noticed. Write down:
• What symptoms do you have, including where it hurts
• How often do you have them
• How long they last
• Any other family members who have migraines
• All the medicines and supplements you take, even over-the-counter ones
• Other medicines you remember taking in the past
Your doctor may order tests to rule out other things that could cause your symptoms, including:
• Blood tests
• Imaging tests like MRI or CT scans
• Electroencephalogram (EEG)

Migraine Treatment and Home Remedies

There’s no cure for migraine headaches. But many drugs can treat or even prevent them. Common migraine treatments include:

Pain relief

Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs often work well. The main ingredients are acetaminophen, aspirin, caffeine, and ibuprofen. Never give aspirin to anyone under the age of 19 because of the risk of Reye’s syndrome. Be careful when you take OTC pain meds, because they might also add to a headache. If you use them too much, you can get rebound headaches or become dependent on them. If you take any OTC pain relievers more than two days a week, talk to your medical professional about prescription drugs that may work better. They may suggest prescription medicines that may work well to end your migraine pain, including triptans and the newer ditans and gepants. Your doctor can tell you if these are right for you.

Nausea medicine

Your doctor can prescribe medication if you get nausea with your migraine.
Triptans.
These drugs balance the chemicals in your brain. You might get a pill to swallow, tablets you dissolve on your tongue, a nasal spray, or a shot. Examples include almotriptan (Axert), eletriptan (Relpax), sumatriptan (Imitrex), rizatriptan (Maxalt), and zolmitriptan (Zomig).
Ergotamine
(Cafergot, Ergomar, Migergot). This also works on the chemicals in your brain.
Lasmiditan (Review).
This drug eases pain, nausea, and sensitivity to light or sound.
CGRP receptor antagonists.
Your doctor might give you rimegepant (Nurtec) or ubrogepant (Ubrelvy) if other treatments don’t help.

Preventive medicines

If other treatments don’t work, your headaches are severe, or you have four or more migraine days a month, your doctor may suggest these. You take them regularly to make your headaches less intense or frequent. They include seizure medicines, blood pressure medicines (like beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers), some antidepressants, and shots of botulinum toxin type A (Botox). CGRP antagonists such as atogepant (Qulipta), eptinezumab (Vyepti), erenumab (Aimovig), fremanezumab (Ajovy), and galcanezumab (Emgality) can also prevent migraines.
Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (sTMS).
You place this device on your head at the start of migraine with aura. It sends a pulse of magnetic energy to the part of your brain, which may stop or reduce pain.

Neuromodulation devices

Other devices can affect the vagus nerve and the trigeminal nerve to relieve or prevent migraines.

Home remedies

You may ease migraine symptoms by:
• Resting with your eyes closed in a dark, quiet room
• Putting a cool compress or ice pack on your forehead
• Drinking plenty of liquids
• Complementary and alternative treatments
Some people get relief with therapies they use in addition to or instead of traditional medical treatment. These are called complementary or alternative treatments. For migraine, they include:

Biofeedback

This helps you take note of stressful situations that could trigger symptoms. If the headache begins slowly, biofeedback can stop the attack before it becomes full-blown.
Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT).
A specialist can teach you how actions and thoughts affect how you sense pain.

Supplements

Research has found that some vitamins, minerals, and herbs can prevent or treat migraines. These include riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, and melatonin. Butterbur may head off migraines, but it can also affect your liver enzymes.

Bodywork

Physical treatments like chiropractic, massage, acupressure, acupuncture, and craniosacral therapy might ease headache symptoms.
Talk to your doctor before trying any complementary or alternative treatments.

Thanks to WEB MD for this information.

Home remedies

You may ease migraine symptoms by:
• Resting with your eyes closed in a dark, quiet room
• Putting a cool compress or ice pack on your forehead
• Drinking plenty of liquids
• Complementary and alternative treatments

Some people get relief with therapies they use in addition to or instead of traditional medical treatment. These are called complementary or alternative treatments. For migraine, they include:

Biofeedback.
This helps you take note of stressful situations that could trigger symptoms. If the headache begins slowly, biofeedback can stop the attack before it becomes full-blown.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).
A specialist can teach you how actions and thoughts affect how you sense pain.


Supplements.

Research has found that some vitamins, minerals, and herbs can prevent or treat migraines. These include riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, and melatonin. Butterbur may head off migraines, but it can also affect your liver enzymes.

Body work.
Physical treatments like chiropractic, massage, acupressure, acupuncture, and craniosacral therapy might ease headache symptoms.
Talk to your doctor before trying any complementary or alternative treatments.

Thanks to WEB MD for this information.

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